The Darkest Part Of The Forrest by Holly Black

Rating: 5 out of 5.

“In the woods is a glass coffin. It rests on the ground, and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives….”

Some stories are written to be read and shelved.

Some stories are written to be adored but never read.

This story has been written to be read and loved and when you’ve finished it you can’t help but tell someone about it.

The Darkest Part of The Forrest by Holly Black has become an instant favourite of mine. I usually don’t get to enjoy the fairytale type of stories as my brain is weird in such a way to reject anything that is anything close to a fairytale. Yet Black managed what many haven’t managed to do. Trick my mind. Make it believe that although there is a magical setting, and although there are elements hidden through out the text that––in retrospect—should have made my brain shut down, it didn’t.

The magic of Black’s writting manages to conjure something refreshing. Something that many tried to do and failed. To bring a new breath into a story that has been told before.

Although it is loosely based on one of my favourite balads in German literature called Erlkönig—having studies it in school—it never crossed my mind that a retelling might be ever based on it. Partially, because I always thought that the original ballad had been perfect in my mind, but also because the elements that Black brings to the story are not things that I thought would fit into the mix.

The Darkest Part of The Forrest is a great story, fairly a quick read for anyone who looks to get lost in a story that takes a folk story—a twisted classic in my opinion—making it feel brand new. It is the perfect start for anyone who enjoys stories set in the real world—or some what similar to the real world—with magical elements, a bad ass female character and queer representation.